Archive for the ‘Conference’ Category

Fosscon 2011 Keynote Video and Slides

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

By Elizabeth Krumbach

The video of Elizabeth Krumbach Keynoting at Fosscon in Philadelphia Saturday 23 July 2011 is now on-line:

Direct link to video on youtube.

The slides are not visible in the video, you can view or download them at slideshare.net: http://www.slideshare.net/pleia2/getting-involved-withfossfosscon

Elizabeth Krumbach Keynoting at Fosscon in Philadelphia Saturday 23 July 2011

Monday, July 18th, 2011

By CJ Fearnley

LinuxForce Systems Administrator, Elizabeth Krumbach will deliver the keynote address this Saturday, 23 July 2011 at FOSSCON. Her talk entitled “Make a Difference for Millions: Getting Involved with FOSS” will help attendees better understand how to contribute to the greater good by participating more actively in FOSS (Free and Open Source Software).

FOSSCON will be held at Basekamp, 723 Chestnut street, 2nd floor; Philadelphia, PA. The doors open at 8 AM on Saturday. Elizabeth’s talk starts at 10 AM. The other talks follow her keynote. A listing of speakers at FOSSCON and the schedule is on-line here. Register to attend FOSSCON for free (no charge!) to learn about the excitement of FOSS in Philadelphia!

I am looking forward to the event. I hope to see you there!

LinuxForce is a sponsor of FOSSCON.

Attending the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Budapest

Thursday, May 5th, 2011

By Elizabeth Krumbach

On Saturday, May 7th, I’ll be taking a flight out to Budapest, Hungary to attend the week-long Ubuntu Developer Summit (UDS) as the kick-off event to the development of the next Ubuntu release, 11.10 (code name Oneiric Ocelot) coming out in October 2011.

The Ubuntu Developer Summit is the seminal Ubuntu event in which we define the focus and plans for our up-coming version of Ubuntu. The event pulls together Canonical engineers, community members, partners, ISVs, upstreams and more into an environment focused on discussion and planning.

My role at these summits as an Ubuntu Community Council member tends to be on community work, which includes recruitment and retention of volunteers to the Ubuntu community. I will also attend sessions related to upstream collaboration; most worthy of note are the collaboration sessions related to Debian as my primary development interest remains there. Debian is the parent distribution of Ubuntu, which LinuxForce almost exclusively deploys to our customers.

This will be my third time attending a UDS. I’m excited to see what I will learn, from the possibilities for the next release to the new ideas I will be able to apply in my day-to-day work. So much comes from such in-person collaborations with fellow contributors.

Finding Help in Ubuntu (SCALE, Feb 25-7 in LA); Ubuntu Diversity; Debian Squeeze AKA 6.0

Thursday, February 24th, 2011

By CJ Fearnley

Here are some news items:

• Elizabeth Krumbach will give a talk on “Finding Help in Ubuntu” at UbuCon in Los Angeles

Tomorrow, February 25th at 9AM, LinuxForce Remote Responder Administrator Elizabeth Krumbach will give the opening talk at UbuCon at the Hilton Los Angeles Airport Hotel. Her talk is entitled Finding Help in Ubuntu. UbuCon is part of SCALE: Southern California Linux Expo which runs 2/25-2/27 2011.

• Elizabeth Krumbach interviewed in Linux Pro Magazine

Linux Pro Magazine interviewed LinuxForce Remote Responder Administrator Elizabeth Krumbach in an article on Ubuntu Increasing Its Diversity. Elizabeth is helping with the effort to increase diversity at the Ubuntu Developer Summit in Budapest in May.

• A new stable version of Debian known as Squeeze or 6.0 was released

The Debian project announced the release of Squeeze on 6 February 2011. eWeek reviewed the new release. We have already upgraded 3 systems and installed several new systems running Debian Squeeze. It is very reliable as we’ve come to expect from Debian.

In addition, the Debian web sites received a new design, a new “look”, that was released together with Squeeze. Check it out at http://www.debian.org.

Some Initiatives Resulting From DebConf10

Thursday, September 30th, 2010

By CJ Fearnley

I attended DebConf10 in early August at Columbia University in New York City. I thought I’d document some of the initiatives that resulted from that event.

I attended the Debian Policy BoF. It inspired me to start reviewing Debian Policy and led to my submission of a bug report to improve the description of the archive areas in Debian. In the BoF (Birds of a Feather) session, Russ Allbery requested help from everyone including non DDs (Debian Developers) to make policy clearer and more descriptive, so I obliged. I see that the negotiated text has been accepted and included in the git repository for the next release.

During the Debian Science sessions that I attended (see especially the video from the Debian Science Round Table), the idea of engaging upstream providers (software projects that are packaged by integrators like Debian) more effectively was discussed. This led me to draft a proposal that I posted to the Debian Project mailing list: Improving coordination / support for upstreams. There was precious little feedback, but I think it is a profoundly important issue: how do we improve coordination of upstreams with projects like Debian that integrate their software. So far there is very little infrastructure or knowledge about this important issue in the management of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software). How do you think we should start to address this problem?

I helped with the herculean task of getting Sage, a FOSS mathematics system, back into Debian. After discussing the issue during the Debian Science track at DebConf10, I met Lucas Nussbaum in the hacklab and he (with help from Luca Falavigna) managed to get the old buggy version of Sage removed from unstable (apparently, this version was causing support issues for the upstream Sage community, so this was a positive step forward). I also submitted five bugs (#592349, #592354, #592425, #592426, and #592429) about new upstream versions that are needed. I posted two detailed reports of work needed on packaging Sage for Debian to appropriate mailing lists. Getting Sage into Debian is the kind of big FOSS management challenge that I’m excited about. But I will need a lot of help to make progress. Let me know if you are interested in contributing to the effort!

Finally, for the record, here are links to the sessions where I participated in the discussion (video is available): Bits from the DPL, SPI BOF, Enterprise Infrastructure BOF, Mathematical Software in Debian, Overall presentation of Debian Science, and Debian Science Round Table.

Attending Debian Day and DebConf10 Next Week

Thursday, July 29th, 2010

By CJ Fearnley

Since I’ve been involved with Debian GNU/Linux for over 15 years, it is exciting that I will be able to attend the first two and a half days of DebConf10 including Debian Day from Sunday to Tuesday August 1–3.

I am particularly looking forward to the following sessions: Pedagogical Freedom: Debian, Free Software, and Education, Beyond Sharing: Open Source Design What are the challenges for the collaborative design process?, FLOSS Manuals: A Vibrant Community for Documentation Development, Bits from the DPL, The Java Packaging Nightmare, Collaboration between Ubuntu and Debian, How We Can Be the Silver Lining of the Cloud, Enterprise Infrastructure BOF How enterprise technologies such as Kerberos, LDAP, Samba, etc can work better together in Debian, Using Debian for Enterprise Infrastructure Stanford University: A Case Study, and more (see the schedule for each day).

I’m also hoping I can also attend on Thursday when the math and science focused sessions will be held, but I’ll have to see how next week’s schedule works out in the office. If you are coming to DebConf, I’ll see you there!

Organizations Learning to Contribute to FOSS “The Right Way”

Friday, May 7th, 2010

By Elizabeth Krumbach

A couple weeks ago I wrote that I would be attending the 4th Annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit. I wrote about much of my experience there and at the Open Source Business Conference back in March over in my personal blog: “Lessons from Open Source Business Conference and the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit”.

However, I also wanted to make a post here to cycle back to some of what I learned from the Collaboration Summit in relation to my March 30th post about contributing, “How and why contributing to FOSS can benefit your organization”. In this post I discussed using community tools, getting involved in the community and what steps you could take to get there. This was based upon several years of my own involvement in the FOSS (Free/Open Source Software) community directly and now my experience working for a company which makes FOSS contributions.

The talks at the Collaboration Summit strengthened my resolve in and increased the clarity of my understanding about the right way of going about contributing to FOSS as a company. At this conference there were multiple talks from major companies and figures within the FOSS business world which drove home the need for working with the community. All of these companies had stories about how they had tried to contribute to FOSS and struggled because they went about contributing as a walled off company rather than contributing just like other contributors did and using the same tools that contributors did.

A keynote which really stood out and succinctly discussed all of this was Dan Frye‘s talk, “10+ Years of Linux at IBM” (video). The first half of the keynote discusses the progress of Linux within IBM, but then he moves into discussing contributing itself. Some of their take-aways were that they needed to get involved directly with small contributions and do away with closed-door meetings and canned corporate responses, IBM employees were empowered to become community members. They needed to learn to collaborate with the community to develop higher quality solutions than they could have in-house, and to start these discussions with the community early in the brainstorming process. Related to collaboration, he also discusses control, and how a company does not have it within a community and needs to learn to deal with that, instead what a company should strive for is influence within a project to help guide direction and priorities. He also suggests never creating a project. Instead he encourages companies to join a project that’s close to what they need and work with them to take it in a direction that can benefit everyone and reach their goals and scratch their itches.

What struck me most at the conference regarding the subject of contributing is they are all reaching the same conclusions about the proper ways to successfully contribute. In the end, they learned that they must fully collaborate openly throughout development with the open source communities they’re working with.

Attending the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit 2010

Tuesday, April 13th, 2010

By Elizabeth Krumbach

On the heels of the 5th Annual Emerging Technologies for the Enterprise Conference (ETE 2010) in Philadelphia that CJ attended last week, I’ll be attending the 4th Annual Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit tomorrow through Friday in San Francisco.

The Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit is an exclusive, invitation-only summit gathering core kernel developers, distribution maintainers, ISVs, end users, system vendors and other community organizations for plenary sessions and workgroup meetings to meet face-to-face to tackle and solve the most pressing issues facing Linux today.

My attendance will be in my capacity as a member of the Ubuntu Community Council as well as my role as a Debian Systems Administrator. As such, my attention will be split at the summit between community and governance interests, like the FOSSBazaar Workgroup and Josh Berkus’ How to Prevent Community: Making Sure Your Pond Stays Small, and talks and panels like Does Open Source Mean Open Cloud? where Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth will be a panelist, and the Linux Standard Base Workgroup and Virtualization discussions.

It’s shaping up to be an exciting summit, if you are also attending be sure to say “Hello”!