Fosscon 2011 Keynote Video and Slides

Wednesday, August 24th, 2011

By Elizabeth Krumbach

The video of Elizabeth Krumbach Keynoting at Fosscon in Philadelphia Saturday 23 July 2011 is now on-line:

Direct link to video on youtube.

The slides are not visible in the video, you can view or download them at slideshare.net: http://www.slideshare.net/pleia2/getting-involved-withfossfosscon

Elizabeth Krumbach Keynoting at Fosscon in Philadelphia Saturday 23 July 2011

Monday, July 18th, 2011

By CJ Fearnley

LinuxForce Systems Administrator, Elizabeth Krumbach will deliver the keynote address this Saturday, 23 July 2011 at FOSSCON. Her talk entitled “Make a Difference for Millions: Getting Involved with FOSS” will help attendees better understand how to contribute to the greater good by participating more actively in FOSS (Free and Open Source Software).

FOSSCON will be held at Basekamp, 723 Chestnut street, 2nd floor; Philadelphia, PA. The doors open at 8 AM on Saturday. Elizabeth’s talk starts at 10 AM. The other talks follow her keynote. A listing of speakers at FOSSCON and the schedule is on-line here. Register to attend FOSSCON for free (no charge!) to learn about the excitement of FOSS in Philadelphia!

I am looking forward to the event. I hope to see you there!

LinuxForce is a sponsor of FOSSCON.

Slides for my talk on “Automating X11 Keystrokes”

Friday, March 18th, 2011

By CJ Fearnley

X11 is the graphical user interface most widely used on Linux operating systems. My slides and video demo for a short talk given at the Philadelphia area Linux Users Group (PLUG) on March 2nd are on-line. The slides briefly cover xrandr (which can also be used to set the screen resolution), xset, xwd / xwud, xdotool, and xautomation including xte. You can get the slides and watch the video at my page on Automating X11 Keystrokes.

Slides Available From Our Managing FOSS Seminar

Saturday, October 31st, 2009

By CJ Fearnley

Last Thursday LinuxForce hosted a seminar on Managing Free and Open Source Software (FOSS) for Business Results. The Seminar home page now has links to the slides from the event. Specifically, there are four sets of slides available:

Please let us know if you have any questions about the content in the slides or from the seminar itself.

Contributing to FOSS: A Business Perspective

Friday, October 23rd, 2009

By Elizabeth Krumbach

Last weekend I had the pleasure of presenting at the Central Pennsylvania Open Source Conference on the topic of Contributing to FOSS (slides available here).

In the talk I explored the many ways individuals can get involved in FOSS (Free and Open Source Software), briefly covering everything from programming to artwork to documentation. As diverse as these contributions are, the common thread is close collaboration with the project itself. In particular, following the procedures in place for contributing to the project is essential. The talk also reviewed some of the benefits of contributing to FOSS, which include career advancement and the ability to expand your professional network.

Although my presentation focused on individual contributions, these lessons also apply to how businesses benefit by contributing to FOSS. When a business approaches a project they should attempt to build a symbiotic relationship with the community. Such a relationship involves following the established community procedures so that your contributions can be easily adopted by the project. Useful scripts and code developments made within the company that can be useful to the greater public should be contributed back and packaging of popular software within the company can be submitted for inclusion and use by the greater community. Testing and bug reporting based on experience using FOSS on their production (or development) systems can provide important information for FOSS developers about the health and status of their projects.

Benefits for businesses that we at LinuxForce have seen first hand are referrals for projects based on documentation work completed on popular community websites (such as Debian-Administration.org) and feedback on our approach leading to improved best practices and building a reputation as experts. By sharing code with projects, others can build upon it to produce more functionality than your team could muster on its own, creating better software for everyone. Additionally, our involvement has allowed us to foster development of Debian packages for software that is used by our clients by, for instance, improving automatic database configuration support and making sure up to date packages are included in releases.

In conclusion, when a business contributes to FOSS they can help drum up business by building a reputation and doing real work within the community, and they help their customers by being on the forefront of development direction and discussions for software that is vital for their own organizations. Contributing to FOSS is good for business, good for your customers, good for the community, and good for the FOSS ecosystem in general.